Grammar – what’s all the fuss about?

We all know what the word ‘grammar’ means, or at least we think we do. For most people, mentioning the word ‘grammar’ brings back memories of school English lessons and the constant drumming of rules.

The Collins English Dictionary (Ninth Edition) 2007 defines ‘grammar’, in part, as ‘The branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology, sometimes also phonology and semantics’.

Therefore, in terms of syntax (sentence structure) and morphology (word structure), ‘grammar’ is the content and structure of the language we use all day, every day. And the fascinating thing is that, contrary to how we may have perceived grammar during our school days as being full of ancient rules, grammar is constantly changing to meet our ever-changing world. It is shaped by our daily use and bends and flexes to adapt to our needs. It is a real, living thing.

At Full Proof, we have a passion for language and grammar. But we accept that not all people share such passion. We also accept that ‘grammar’ has its place. We are living in a fast world where all forms of communication have to be quick, where we don’t have to be slaves to formal grammatical rules.

We use ‘textspeak’ and ‘email speak’ where we can still make ourselves understood. New words are constantly being introduced into our language, and electronic social networking means that new forms of language can be communicated at great speed to a vast number of people.

A high-quality proofreading service will ensure that, whatever type of language is used, it is checked, corrected and edited in accordance with the prevailing rules of grammar and the changing nature of our language.

As well as ensuring that work is grammatically correct, at Full Proof we do our best to retain the ‘style’ and ‘personality’ of the author. This can be achieved by making corrections and/or suggestions in a way that is sensitive to the message the author is conveying.

We believe that, in its rawest form, ‘grammar’ is about communicating effectively. Making oneself understood. And we think that’s worth all the fuss in the world.

To read more original articles about grammar, please click here.